SPONSORS
 

 
U.S. Department of Transportation
Maritime Administration
Maritime Administration Logo - a circle surrounded by a rope and the words, "Maritime Administration, 1950, United States of America". Within the circle is an eagle perched at top of a red, white and blue shield with an anchor

 
 

 

 


 


 

THE SPEAKERS

ADMIRAL THOMAS COLLINS
Commandant
US Coast Guard

CAPTAIN WILLIAM SCHUBERT
U. S. Maritime Administrator

FOTIS KARAMITSOS
Director
Maritime Transport, European Commission

OLUF ULSETH
State Secretary
Norwegian Ministry of Trade & Industry

STEVEN BLIGH
CEO, Maritime & Coastguard Agency, U.K.

REAR ADMIRAL THOMAS GILMOUR
Assistant Commandant for Marine Safety, Security and Environmental Protection, U. S. Coast Guard

Rear Admiral Richard Larrabee, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret)
Director Port Commerce Department
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

Admiral Robert E. Kramek
President
ABS Americas

Richard T. du Moulin
Chairman, Intertanko North American Committee
President, Intrepid Shipping LLC

MATT SIMMONS
Chairman & President
Simmons & Company International

PETER GEORGIOPOULOS
Chairman
General Maritime

CRAIG H.  STEVENSON
Chairman and CEO
OMI Corporation


WILLIAM GRAY
President
Gray Maritime Co.

GRAHAM PORTER
Vice President
Seaspan Container Line Ltd

CARL ERIK HAAVALDSEN
Board Member
Trasnpetrol Group

Charles G. Raymond
Chairman, President and CEO
Horizon Lines, LLC

Peter I. Keller
Executive VP and COO
NYK Line (NA), Inc.

Bob Bishop
Chief Operating Officer
V. Ships shipmanagement

 

ARThUR BOWRING
Managing Director
Hong Kong Shipowners Association
, China

ALFONS GUINIER
Secretary General
European Community Shipowners' Association (ECSA)

PIETER VAN AGTMAAL
Managing Director
Royal Association of Netherlands Shipowners

JOSEPH J. COX
President
Chamber of Shipping of America

Thomas A. Allegretti
President & CEO
The American Waterways Operators, Arlington, Virginia

Tim Gaughan
Shell International Trading and Shipping Company Limited 

PAUL LEAND
CEO
American Marine Advisors

AXEL SCROEDER
CEO
MPC CAPITAL, GERMANY

MICHAEL GREY
Maritime Editor / Commentator
Lloyd's List, U.K.

TACO VAN DER MAST
Member of the Managing Board and Managing Director
NIB CAPITAL BANK, The Nethrlands

Svein Engh
Managing Director
Fortis Capital USA

Ron Beck
Managing Director
Oaktree

DANIEL F. SHEEHAN
Advisor
Maritime Administration of the Marshall Islands

PAUL MARKIDES
Director
Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF)

UGO SALERNO
Chairman, IACS Council
CEO, RINA, Italy

HUGH BAKER
Director Global Shipping Group
ING Bank, U.K.

Anthony GURNEE
Managing Partner
Tridens LLC

CLAY MAITLAND
Managing Partner
International registries

John Mervyn Jones
Director
Bahamas Maritime Authority

Philip Roger
Director Research
Galbraiths, UK

ALAN GAVIN
Marine Business Director
Lloyd's Register, U.K.

BRUCE CARLTON
U.S. Maritime Administration

HANS PAYER
External Affairs Advisor, Germanischer Lloyd, Germany

JEFFREY GOETZ
Poten & Partners

Stephen Shaffer
Project Economist
Moffatt Nichol


ANTONY ARGYROPOULOS
Investment Banker

NICOLETTE VAN DER JAGT
Secretary General
European Shippers Council, Belgium

PETER SHAERF
Vice Chairman of Short Sea Shipping Co-operative, SCOOP
Senior Vice President, American Marine Advisors

JANNIS KOSTOULAS
President
MARE FORUM B.V. The Netherlands

ROBERT C. NORTH, Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.)
President
North Star Maritime, Inc.

Lloyd Thompson
Senior Transportation Planner
Moffatt Nichol

Robert DeMotta
Managing Director Marine
Aon Risk Services

 


  

 

Following the success of Mare Forum Houston 2002: A GLOBAL FORUM on the MARITIME TRANSPORTATION OF ENERGY: “IDENTIFYING THE PRIORITY POLICY ISSUES" Mare Forum continues with the next edition in New York.  The conference is set for:
 
April 26th & 27th 2004
at the
Hilton Hotel New York, U.S.A.

Navigating Through a Sea of Change
Toward a Safe, Secure, Environmentally Sound and Profitable Maritime Industry



INTRODUCTION

Navigating through a Sea of Change is a Mare Forum conference that aims to tackle the inhibiting factors which prevent the shipping industry from being profitable, safe, secure and environmentally sound.

Shipping is an essential industry, that grows with world trade and is not threatened by alternative modes of transport. Most of it is operated in a safe and secure fashion, it is technically advanced and it has made substantial strides in its environmental improvements. But it continues to be identified with the bad practices of a sub-standard minority and mostly because the public scarcely knows it is there, is regarded as a marginal player and well down in the scale of public estimation. This is reflected in its poor performance in stock markets and the difficulties it experiences in its attempts to raise capital.

It has scarcely been helped by its traditional volatility , and its feast to famine record over the years. Over competition, political interference in the supply-demand situation, the continued presence of government interests, notably in shipbuilding areas, all contribute to its failure to present a picture of sustained profitability. Against this, there are certain strong and flexible companies which continue to prosper , year on year, free from the short termism that affects the performance of many of their competitors.


"Leave us alone to get on with the job we do best" is the heartfelt cry from the shipping industry, against a background which sees so many difficult issues intruding into the sea transport market. The shipping practitioner indeed navigates through this "sea of change" and it is the scale and extent of these changes which in 2003 cause inordinate concern. Issues of safety and regulation continue to press in on the industry, despite its substantial statistical safety improvements. Because of the sub-standard minority the regulator is increasingly active.

Because of a few highly charged accidents , the whole framework of regulation itself is under threat, with the prospect of regional prescriptions and a chaotic regulatory patchwork around the world that would make the work of international shipping companies exceedingly difficult. A proven and mostly efficient international regulatory system as represented by the International Maritime Organisation is under attack. As a result of political action following a few well-publicised accidents, the shipowner now sees for the first time compulsory age limits on ships, regardless of condition. He has to cope with political threats to the international law of the sea. Additionally, attitudes to flag states are changing , with a more critical view being taken of the performance of some of these. Are we reaching a stage when the flag a vessel flies matters again , as an indicator of quality and of efficient regulatory oversight ?

The sea of change following 9/11 has also become understandably stormy. The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code also presupposes a whole range of operational changes which shipowners and port operators must take on board in the short term, while barely comprehending the consequences. What will this mean to the smooth running of the ship and the role of the port and terminal in expediting its departure ? What will it all cost and how will this be passed on to the user of transport? In the ISPS Code we are heading out to sea, but what is over the horizon is distinctly cloudy?

Despite all the economic uncertainties, many of the shipping industry sectors are showing strong growth and promise, and demonstrating economic improvement. There are exciting investments taking place in the LNG , passenger shipping and container sectors, while both dry bulk and tankers have been exhibiting signs of rude health. But will this continue apace, and how will the capital providers regard the future prospects for the industry in a changing world?

Ships are useless without ports , but the ports and terminals themselves are facing numerous problems, not least their ability to adapt to new security constraints, which comes on top of demand for new facilities, for land for new terminals and for deep water for a new generation of big ships. All this presupposes access to substantial capital for such investments, which the user would rather not pay. But port waters, like the sea itself, reflect changing attitudes, and the old views that port facilities were somehow the responsibility of the nation state seem very dated in relation to new ideas of public/private partnerships for investment, along with the rise of the international port and terminal operating company.

Ports and terminals are increasingly affected by congestion, and the infrastructural conditions in their hinterlands. Coastal, inland and short sea shipping are increasingly being offered as a solution for this landside congestion, and gradually, in a number of locations around the world the empty sea and waterway is being seen as a viable alternative. But this is not a simple modal shift, or a response to a changed government policy, but a long term change that will only occur if there is a willingness to really invest in coastal shipping and there is sufficient original thinking in the ports and waterway areas. There are clearly major opportunities here, whether the congestion on US N-S trunk routes are being considered, or that around major hubs are being considered. Can a strategy be developed?

All of these contemporary issues will be covered in this exciting conference, which will bring together experts from the US and abroad, to produce a passage plan that will chart the way across the sea of change.

 

THE GOAL:

Identify problem areas within major marine transportation issues, which must be given management emphasis by senior government and industry executives in seeking the right balance of safety, security and environmental protection with profitability

THE PROCESS:

The Forum will examine issues of the day impacting flag and port states, shipowners, markets, ports and terminals and governments. 

These issues include:

The core business and responsibilities of flag administrations

Trends in Global Commodity Movements, Industry forecasts - consolidations and newbuildings

Capital Markets & Availability of  capital

Maritime security implementation, port challenges

Viability of short sea shipping

Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about, debate and influence the resolution of Forum issues with policy makers from industry and government.
Mare Forum is noted for its unique program structure and emphasis on opportunities for attendee participation, with each panel session including a one hour discussion period along with special discussion group leaders.


THE VENUE
:

The venue for the Conference will be the Hilton Hotel in New York City located between Central Park and Times Square. The United States is the world’s largest trading nation with New York as a leading port and international center for shipping interests and ship finance. Here, participants will find exceptional business networking opportunities as well a world class leisure activities.

CONFERENCE CO-CHAIRS:

Richard T. du Moulin
Chairman, Intertanko North American Committee
President, Intrepid Shipping LLC


Rear Admiral Richard Larrabee, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.)
Director, Port Commerce Department
Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

SESSION CHAIRMEN:

Michael GREY
Maritime Editor / Commentator, Lloyd's List

Joseph J. Cox
President, Chamber of Shipping of America

Taco van der mast
Member of the Managing Board and Managing Director
NIB CAPITAL BANK

Daniel F. Sheehan
Advisor, Maritime Administration of the Marshall Islands

PETER SHAERF
Vice Chairman of Short Sea Shipping Co-operative, SCOOP
Senior Vice President, American Marine Advisors


PROGRAM DIRECTORS:

JANNIS KOSTOULAS
Managing Director MARE FORUM B.V.

Robert C. North, Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.)
President, North Star Maritime, Inc.

Mare Forum USA 2004 will stand apart from other conferences through its format, content and through the level and degree of interactivity between the participants. Like all Mare Forum conferences, the ultimate goal of the conference is to provide a true forum where all participants are invited to take part in the discussion/ debate periods after every session of high profile speakers from government and industry have directly addressed the issues.

We are looking forward to welcoming you to New York


THE PROGRAMME


INFORMATION:

JANNIS KOSTOULAS
President
MARE FORUM B.V.
Beurs - World Trade Center
P.O. Box 30027
3001 DA Rotterdam
The Netherlands
Robert C. North 
Rear Admiral, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.)
President
North Star Maritime, Inc.
152 River Run
Queenstown, MD 21658
USA
 
Phone: +31.10.281 0655 Phone: +1.410-827-4054
Fax: +31.10.205.5655 Fax: +1.410-827-3910
Email:

kostoulas@mareforum.com

Email:

northstar@dmv.com

 

To receive information on the programme and how to register for
MARE FORUM USA 2004:
"The Maritime Industry - Navigating Through a Sea of Change"
26 & 27 April  2004 - HILTON HOTEL - New York - U.S.A.

please click here