Mare Forum USA 2010
mare forum's Mare Forum USA 2010 photoset Mare Forum USA 2010 photoset

 
 

 

 

 

 




    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 




    

 

 

MARE FORUM USA 2011

MARITIME TRANSPORTATION OF ENERGY
ENERGY INDEPENDENCE IN AMERICA,
CARBON EMISSIONS REDUCTION AND OTHER INITIATIVES:

“EVERYTHING HAS CHANGED”


A GOVERNMENT-INDUSTRY DIALOG


Tuesday November 15, 2011
Hiton Houston North
Houston - Texas - U.S.A.


 

introduction

BACKGROUND and CONFERENCE GOAL: 

This conference builds on the previous Mare Forum energy transportation conference held in Houston in February 2010. 

  • “Situation”: The focus of efforts by the United States to increase energy independence has changed. While lease sales in Alaska and the Gulf of Mexico may continue, dramatic expansion of offshore energy exploration and development into previously undeveloped areas is no longer an option. However, the use of alternative energy sources, especially on-shore production of natural gas and shale-gas deposits in North America, has increased, even to the point of the U.S. becoming a natural gas exporter. At the same time, the need to reduce carbon and other emissions continues to increase. All of these initiatives will create potentially significant impacts on the energy industry and transportation of energy cargoes by international shipping and United States domestic shipping.
     

  • “Challenge”: The maritime transportation and energy industries should produce and provide to consumers worldwide, readily available and reliable energy resources at the lowest possible cost, while enjoying a reasonable profit. This must be accomplished in a safe, secure and environmentally responsible manner but also in a way that facilitates commerce to minimize transportation costs.
     

  • “Priorities”: Overall, what are the priority issues most affecting energy development and marine transportation which must be coordinated and managed together by government and the private sector, to meet current and long-term energy and maritime transportation needs in a safe, secure and environmentally sound manner and also facilitate commerce?

    The Conference Goal will be to develop a consensus on these issues and others as developed by the Conference speakers and attendees. The unique Mare Forum format, which emphasizes debate and discussion, will provide attendees with the opportunity to learn about, debate and influence the resolution of these and other questions with senior policy makers from industry and government.

    THE VENUE
    The venue for the Conference will be held at the Hilton Houston North, in Houston, Texas. The United States is the world’s largest trading nation and consumer of energy resources with Houston as the center of activity for the energy industry as well as an international seaport and center for shipping interests. Here, participants will find exceptional business networking opportunities as well as world class leisure activities.


    CONFERENCE COMMITTEE:

    Joseph J. Cox
    President, Chamber of Shipping of America
    Conference Chairman


    Jannis Kostoulas
    Chairman, Mare Forum

    RADM Robert C. North, U.S. Coast Guard (ret)
    President, North Star Maritime, Inc.
     


(as of  11 November)

 

    Monday, November 14, 2011
Hilton Houston North
 
18:00   Registration
 
19:00 - 21:00   Welcome Reception
hosted by


 
    Tuesday, November 15, 2011
Hilton Houston North
 
07:30   Registration
 
08:30   Opening and Introduction
Joseph J. Cox
President, Chamber of Shipping of America
Conference Chairman

“Situation”:  United States is attempting to increase energy independence by expanding offshore oil and gas development and use of alternative energy sources; and, at the same time, reduce carbon and other emissions.  These initiatives will create potentially significant impacts on the energy industry and transportation of energy cargoes by international shipping and United States domestic shipping.   

“Challenge”:  The maritime transportation and energy industries should produce and provide to consumers worldwide, readily available and reliable energy resources at the lowest possible cost, while enjoying a reasonable profit.  This must be accomplished in a safe, secure and environmentally responsible manner but also in a way that facilitates commerce to minimize transportation costs.

 “Priorities”: Overall, what are the priority regulatory issues most affecting marine transportation and energy development which must be coordinated and managed together by government and the private sector, to meet current and long-term energy and maritime transportation needs in a safe, secure and environmentally sound manner and also facilitate commerce?

THIS CONFERENCE will examine through a structured approach, the current state and future need and validity relative to the Priorities and provide an assessment of the impact of the energy and financial markets on energy transportation by international shipping.

 

    Session 1:

Setting the Scene Part 1
Keynote Speakers
Government and Industry


Themes:
Senior leaders representing government and industry describe their view of the “Situation” from a broad policy perspective, and potential barriers to meeting the “challenge”.  
 
08:50-09:00   Session Moderator
Joseph J. Cox
President, Chamber of Shipping of America
Conference Chairman
 
09:00- 10:00   Keynote Speakers
Senior leaders representing Government and Industry

RADM Roy Nash
Commander, Eighth Coast Guard District
U.S. Coast Guard

Chris Wiernicki
CEO and President
ABS

 
Robin Rorick
Director of Marine and Security
American Petroleum Institute

 
    Setting the Scene Part 2
Energy Economics
 
10:00-
10:30
  Michael Economides
Professor, Cullen College of Engineering, University of Houston
Managing Partner, Dr. Michael J. Economides Consultants,
Editor-in-Chief "Energy Tribune"
 
10:30- 11:10   Discussion and debate between the speakers, members of the discussion panel and audience participants

Discussion Leaders:
Captain Anuj Chopra
President, Anglo-Eastern (Houston) LLC


Jon Waldron
Partner, Blank Rome, LLP

Charles W. Parks (invited)
Vice President, Marine
Tesoro Corporation

Paul Glandt
Wärtsilä

Jim Farley
Executive Vice President-Operations
Kirby Inland Marine

Barry Parker
bdp1 Consulting LTD



 

11:10- 11:30   Break
    Session 2:

Energy Availability and Air Emissions
The Government Perspective

Themes: Efforts toward energy independence; offshore energy exploration possibilities; shale gas production potential and environmental issues; LNG as an alternative energy source for ships; impact of greenhouse gas emissions reduction; maritime safety and environmental protection concerns; current priority regulatory projects, their need, status and timelines.
 
11:30- 11:40   Moderator’s introduction
Vice Admiral Jim Card
US Coast Guard (Ret.)
 
11:40- 11:50    Dept of Energy Perspective – Towards Energy Independence
Roy Long
Technology Manager
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)
Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil

 
11:50- 12:00   National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration
Glenn Boledovich
Chief, Policy, Planning and Analysis Division
NOAA National Ocean Service

 
12:00-12:10   US Coast Guard - Safety and Environmental Protection Aspects
RADM James Watson
Director of Prevention Policy
U.S. Coast Guard
 
12:10– 13:00   Discussion and Debate between speakers, members of the discussion panel and audience participants.

Questions to be addressed by panelists and for discussion and debate by participants:

 

  • What are the elements of the current US strategy for energy independence?

  • Are there feasible alternatives to traditional oil, gas and coal energy resources?

  • What is the potential for LNG use in the United States as an alternative fuel and for export?

  • Is LNG really the energy source of choice for the future when balanced against available technology and safety, security and environmental concerns?

  • What are the safety concerns over LNG as an alternative fuel for ships?

  • What is the current 5-Year Program for U.S. offshore energy development in the Gulf of Mexico, Alaska National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska’s Cook Inlet, Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea?

  • Environmental impact of Alaska/Arctic exploration and production?    

  • Is there sufficient U.S. refinery capacity to process expanded domestic energy production and to provide distillate fuels for the US/Canada ECA?

  • How will the ECA effect fuel availability?

  • Will ECA fuel switching pose maritime safety problems and increase marine casualty and oil spill potential?

  • LNG potential for emissions reductions?

  • How will efforts to control carbon emissions in the U.S. affect refinery production?  

  • What is the impact of the outcome of the IMO 62nd Session of the Marine Environmental Protection Committee on US efforts to reduce carbon emissions?

  • What should be the highest priority international and U.S. regulatory initiatives?          

Discussion Leaders:
Captain Anuj Chopra
President, Anglo-Eastern (Houston) LLC

Jon Waldron
Partner, Blank Rome, LLP

Charles W. Parks (invited)
Vice President, Marine
Tesoro Corporation

Paul Glandt
Wärtsilä

Jim Farley
Executive Vice President-Operations
Kirby Inland Marine

Barry Parker
bdp1 Consulting LTD

 

     
13:00-
14:00
  Lunch

 
    session 3  

The Marine Transportation Industry Perspective
Energy Independence and Carbon Reduction Initiatives in America - Setting the Right Balance

 

Themes - What is the overall impact on maritime transportation of energy given the following: US Gulf of Mexico oil and gas exploration/production has declined but oil and gas leases in the Central Gulf may go on sale in 2012 and new leases in offshore Alaska are expected. LNG production, especially shale gas is expected to increase to the point of creating an export market. US refined product exports have increased. Carbon reduction targets will impact US refining demand and impact shipping.

 

14:00-14:10 Moderator's introduction
Bill Gallagher
President
International Registries, Inc./ Marshall Islands Registry
 
14:10-14:20   Greater Houston Port Bureau Perspective
Captain Bill Diehl
President, Greater Houston Port Bureau

 
14:20-14:30   Meeting the Challenges - The Tanker Owner's Perspective
Eric Smith
Chief Commercial Officer, OSG America

 
14:30-14:40   LNG Shipping Opportunities
Captain Daniel K. Fuller
Director, Marine Operations
Cheniere LNG O&M Services, L.P.

 
14:40-14:50   The International Tanker Market Outlook
Gary Morgan
Director, Analyst Team, Clarksons
 
14:50
-
15:30
  Discussion and Debate between speakers and audience participants.

Questions to be addressed:
  • What are the drilling industry expectations with regard to U.S. offshore energy development in the Gulf of Mexico, Alaska National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska’s Cook Inlet, Chukchi Sea and Beaufort Sea?

  • How has decreased U.S. offshore oil production impacted the offshore and marine transportation industries in the United States?

  • What will be the potential impact of expanded Alaska/Arctic offshore development on domestic crude oil tanker operations?

  • How will the overall domestic/imported energy balance in the U.S. affect international crude oil import transportation?

  • Will U.S. refined product export volume increase?  

  • What are the marine transportation industry opportunities created by expanded domestic production of LNG?

  • What will be the impact of increased domestic LNG production as an alternative fuel to petroleum?

  • How will the refining industry cope with reduced carbon allowances?

  • What should be the highest priority international and U.S. regulatory initiatives?

Discussion Leaders:
Captain Anuj Chopra
President, Anglo-Eastern (Houston) LLC

Jon Waldron
Partner, Blank Rome, LLP

Charles W. Parks (invited)
Vice President, Marine
Tesoro Corporation

Paul Glandt
Wärtsilä

Jim Farley
Executive Vice President-Operations
Kirby Inland Marine

Barry Parker
bdp1 Consulting LTD

 

15:30-15:40
 
  Break
 
    session 4  

The Classification Society Perspective – Technology Solutions for Environmental Problems

Themes: Improvements in offshore technology; exhaust gas cleaning systems and other alternative technology in emissions reduction; reducing emissions from existing engines; feasibility of the IMO energy efficiency design index for new ships
 
15:50-16:00   Moderator's introduction
Daniel F. Sheehan, P.E.
 
16:00-16:10
 
  Charlie Dorchak
Director, Environmental Solutions

ABS
 
16:10-16:20   Kenneth Vareide,
Director of Operations
Det Norske Veritas

 
16:20-16:30   Jim Fernie
Lloyd’s Register
 
16:30-16:40   Uwe Bullwinkel
Executive Vice President, Region Americas.

Germanischer Lloyd

 
16:40
-
17:10
  Discussion and Debate between speakers, members of the discussion panel and audience participants.

Questions to be addressed by panelists and for discussion and debate by participants:
  • What are the most promising technologies available to reduce carbon emissions?

  • What is the potential for CNG fuel for shipping?

  • What environmentally friendly new ship concept designs are being developed by class?   

  • Are classification societies prepared to approve exhaust gas cleaning systems (EGCS) under MARPOL Annex VI for both SOx and NOx?  Carbon?

  • How will class implement the recently IMO adopted EEDI in class rules and on behalf of flag administrations?

  • Are there improvements in technology that facilitate offshore oil and gas exploration and production?

Discussion Leaders:

Captain Anuj Chopra
President, Anglo-Eastern (Houston) LLC

Jon Waldron
Partner, Blank Rome, LLP

Charles W. Parks (invited)
Vice President, Marine
Tesoro Corporation

Paul Glandt
Wärtsilä

Jim Farley
Executive Vice President-Operations
Kirby Inland Marine

Barry Parker
bdp1 Consulting LTD

 

    session 5  

Conclusion – A Focused Agenda for Policy Makers
Prioritization of Issues
 
   

Conference Chairman, Session Chairmen and Conference participants synthesize and prioritize the issues discussed to develop a list of priorities for government and industry to address together concerning the safe and environmentally sound exploration, development and maritime transportation of energy resources to best strive for US energy independence and to maintain viable offshore and marine transportation industries. 
 

17:10 - 18:00   Open discussion where Moderators of Sessions 1-5 discuss the results of their panels between themselves and the participants and recommend prioritization of issues developed during the Conference

 

18:00 -
19
:00
  Closing reception
 
     


 


INFORMATION
For further information on the conference please contact:

MARE FORUM
P.O. Box 3108
3003 AC Rotterdam
The Netherlands

Tel: +31.10.842 57 97
Fax:
+31.10.844 99 69

E:
info@mareforum.com